Hurricane Preparedness

The Atlantic hurricane season is from June 1 through November 30.

A hurricane is a specific type of tropical cyclone, which is a rotating, organized system of clouds and thunderstorms that originates over tropical or subtropical waters and has a closed low-level circulation. Tropical cyclones rotate counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere.

  • Tropical Depression: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 38 mph (33 knots) or less.

  • Tropical Storm: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph (34 to 63 knots).

  • Hurricane: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.

  • Major Hurricane: A tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 111 mph (96 knots) or higher, corresponding to a Category 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

Resources

NOAA National Hurricane Center

State of Texas

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Disaster Supply Kit

Other Resources

After the Storm: Navigating FEMA Factsheets

Texas Sea Grant has modified a series of information sheets, first developed by the Louisiana Sea Grant Law and Policy Program, to help those affected by major storms to navigate Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) programs and related legal issues during rebuilding.

NOAA Ocean Service

COVID-19 and Hurricane Preparedness

  • Disaster kits need to include hand sanitizer, cleaning products, and two cloth face coverings for each member of the family who can wear one.
  • Damage assessment work and applying for assistance is going to be done virtually more than ever o This means photo-documentation of assets before and after an event is extra important.
  • Those involved in sheltering are doing their best to build in social distancing and other safety measures, but people may still be afraid to seek shelter and this may well mean more people in harms way.

COVID-19 Hurricane Resources