2019 Publications

Legal Mechanisms for Mitigating Flood Impacts in Texas Coastal Communities.

Philip Bedford, Alexis Long, Thomas Long, Erin Milliken, Lauren Thomas, Alexis Yelvington. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-201.)

Flooding is a major source of concern for Texas’ coastal communities. It affects the quality of infrastructure, the lives of citizens, and the ecological systems upon which coastal communities in Texas rely. To plan for and mitigate the impacts of flooding, Texas coastal communities may implement land use tools such as zoning, drainage utility systems, eminent domain, exactions, and easements. Additionally, these communities can benefit from understanding how flooding affects water quality and the tools available to restore water bodies to healthy water quality levels. Finally, implementing additional programs for education and ecotourism will help citizens develop knowledge of the impacts of flooding and ways to plan and mitigate for coastal flooding.Land use tools can help communities plan for and mitigate flooding. Section III addresses zoning, a land use tool that most municipalities already utilize to organize development. Zoning can help mitigate flooding, drainage, and water quality issues, which, Texas coastal communities continually battle. Section IV discusses municipal drainage utility systems, which are a mechanism available to municipalities to generate dedicated funds that can help offset costs associated with providing stormwater management. Section V addresses land use and revenue-​building tools such as easements, eminent domain, and exactions, which are vital for maintaining existing and new developments in Texas coastal communities. Additionally, Section VI addresses conservation easements, which are a flexible tool that can enhance community resilience through increasing purchase power, establishing protected legal rights, and minimizing hazardous flood impacts.Maintai​ning good water quality is important for sustaining the diverse ecosystems located within and around Texas coastal communities. Water quality is regulated at the federal level through the Clean Water Act. As discussed in Section VII, the state of Texas is authorized to implement and enforce these regulations by implementing point source and nonpoint source pollutants programs, issuing permits, implementing stormwater discharge programs, collecting water quality data, and setting water quality standards. The state of Texas also assists local communities with implementing restorative programs, such as Watershed Protection Programs, to help local stakeholders restore impaired water bodies.Section VIII addresses ecotourism and how these distinct economic initiatives can help highlight the importance of ecosystem services to local communities. Section VIX discusses the role of education in improving awareness within the community and among visitors, and how making conscious decisions can allow coastal communities to protect their ecosystem and protect against flooding.

 

City of Hitchcock Comprehensive Plan 2020-2040.

John Cooper, Jaime Masterson, Jeewasmi Thapa, Walter Peacock, Steven Washington. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-202.)

The City of Hitchcock is a resilient community dedicated to sustainable growth, high quality of life and attracting development to the area. The Comprehensive Plan 2020-2040 is designed to guide the City of Hitchcock for its future growth. Planning for the future is essential for responsible growth. The city should be a safe and pleasant place for the people to reside in. We want to mold our cities into a place that provides economic opportunities and treats all its citizens fairly. The Hitchcock Comprehensive Plan provides a vision of growth for the City of Hitchcock and identifies strategies to accomplish them. Hitchcock Comprehensive Plan 2020-2040 provides a guide for the future growth of the city. This document was developed and prepared by Texas Target Communities at Texas A&M University in partnership with the City of Hitchcock and Texas Sea Grant.

 

A Qualitative Analysis of Youth Perspectives on Rockport Municipal Planning.

Jenna Kaya Charles, Katherine Comeaux, Gabriel Cuellar, Shida Dusman, Justin Guajardo, James Hills, Brittany Houlihan, Lee Pradia, Cynthia Ramos, Liz Romo, Marina Saenz, Richard Schreiber, Claire Snyder, Robert Tepera, Huang Zhang, Beth Rauhaus, Ashley Bennis, Jaimie Hicks Masterson, Jeewasmi Thapa, Amanda Torres. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-202.)

Texas Target Communities (TTC) is a service-learning program and university-wide community engagement initiative designed to create resilient and sustainable communities while providing students with appropriate training. In 2018, TTC selected the cities of Rockport and Hitchcock as Community Partners for 2018-2019. Rockport, in collaboration with TTC, is in the process of developing a new comprehensive plan. TTC provided community resiliency workshops to ensure their perspective was included in this plan. However, existing research suggests that youth participation within civic engagement is low, and their limited participation may result in their unique perceptions being overlooked. Accordingly, in February 2019, the Master of Public Administration (MPA) Capstone students at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi joined TTC’s efforts to support the City of Rockport in creating a new comprehensive plan. The MPA students collected qualitative data from upper-level Social Studies students at Rockport High School about their perceptions of their community and what they hope to see from the development of the City of Rockport. The researchers conclude that youth participants most value the sense of community and natural resources of Rockport. Participants want more youth activities, job opportunities, and recognition within the community, and they are most concerned with improving infrastructure, building affordable housing, being including, and protecting the local environment.

 

Texas Sea Grant Supporting Coastal Communities, Businesses, and Texans, 2014-2017 Impacts.

Heather Wade, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-301.)

This full-color card features 2014-2017 impacts, including: 4,316 acres of coastal habitat restored; 277 university students supported; 70 students received jobs in their field within two years of graduation; 37 communities implemented sustainable development practices; impacting over 2 million people; 342,218 hours of volunteer time; 3,205 businesses or jobs retained or created; 31 tools used for ecosystem based management; 160,565 grade school students and general public reached through informal education programs; 1,363 fishermen who modified practices for fisheries sustainability and seafood safety; and $33,686,842 in economic impact to the State of Texas.

 
Texas Sea Grant 2018 Impacts.

Heather Wade, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-302.)

This full-color card features 2018 impacts. Texas Sea Grant educated students, community members, communities; restored coastal lands; and economically impacted Texas.

 

Texas Sea Grant Focus Areas.

Heather Wade, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-303.)

This poster displays Texas Sea Grant's four focus areas of research and extension work.

 

Healthy Coastal Ecosystems at Texas Sea Grant.

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-304.)

This poster describes one of Texas Sea Grant's focus areas: Healthy Coastal Ecosystems. Coastal ecosystems are the foundation of communities and economies on the Texas coast, but their health is a challenge to maintain. They are essential for commercial and recreational fishing and tourism, but their value is also priceless to those who live, work, and play along our coast. These ecosystems act as buffers against storms, flooding, and other hazards. Texas Sea Grant funds research and supports the science-based efforts of extension agents in engaging citizen scientists, monitoring, and responding to ecological stressors.

 
Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture at Texas Sea Grant.

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-305.)

This poster describes one of Texas Sea Grant's focus areas: Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture. Seafood harvesting and production constitutes one of the most important industries on the Texas coast. Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture are necessary to meet the current and future public demand of the Texas seafood industry and economy. Texas Sea Grant facilitates this sustainability by training fishers in economically viable, sustainable, and safe practices while educating consumers about the health benefits of locally sourced seafood. Texas Sea Grant also funds sustainable fisheries and aquaculture research to revolutionize and refine the industry.

 

Resilient Communities and Economies at Texas Sea Grant.

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-306.)

This poster describes one of Texas Sea Grant's focus areas: Resilient Communities and Economies. To accommodate more human activity while balancing demands on coastal resources, Texas must develop innovative policies, institutional capacities, and management approaches to increase community resilience. Texas Sea Grant funds cutting-edge research to support these advancements. Through extension efforts, Texas Sea Grant also supports education, outreach, technical assistance, facilitation, and planning.

 
Environmental Literacy & Workforce Development at Texas Sea Grant.

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-307.)

This poster describes one of Texas Sea Grant's focus areas: Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development. The scientific, technical, and communications skills needed to address environmental challenges facing our nation are critical to developing an impactful workforce. Literacy in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in the workplace is necessary to advance pioneering research and to promote enhanced resource management and sustainable development. Texas Sea Grant promotes literacy by supporting students (including university graduates, undergraduate and graduate students, interns, and fellows) and the development of STEM educational programs, tools, and products.

 

Coastal & Ocean Science at Work for Texans: 2019 Texas Sea Grant Research Symposium Poster.

Kimber De Salvo, Christine Figgener. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-308.)

This poster advertises the Texas Sea Grant's first Coastal and Ocean Science at Work for Texans Research Symposium where 2014-2017 funded-research and extension work was presented on April 9th 2019. Research focus areas include: Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, Resilient Communities and Economies, and Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development.

 

Texas Sea Grant Funded Researchers 2014-2017.

Kimber De Salvo, Christine Figgener, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-309.)

This booklet highlights all 2014-2017 Texas Sea Grant-funded PI and graduate student research. Research areas include the following four focus areas: Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Resilient Communities & Economies, Sustainable Fisheries & Aquaculture, and Environmental Literacy & Workforce Development.

 
Coastal & Ocean Science at Work for Texans: 2019 Texas Sea Grant Research Symposium Program.

Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-310.)

This program lists all of the 2014-2017 Texas Sea Grant-funded researchers who presented research posters at the "Coastal & Ocean Science at Work for Texans: 2019 Texas Sea Grant Research Symposium."  The back of the program highlights Texas Sea Grant-funded research metrics from 2014-2017 including the number of projects funded, the number of peer-reviewed articles published, the number of student theses published, and the total amount awarded.

 

2019 Federal Site Review Briefing Book FY 2014-2017.

Pamela Plotkin. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-311.)

Every four years state Sea Grant programs are evaluated by a site review team composed of members of NOAA’s National Sea Grant Office and other experts named by NOAA. This is a requirement for Texas A&M University’s designation as the Sea Grant College of Texas. Programs are evaluated for their leadership, organization, relevance, education and training, advisory services, partnerships, productivity, and for the programmed team approach they use across their organization to address coastal and ocean issues of concern to the state. We are pleased to provide this site review briefing book to illustrate the high-quality and balanced program of research, education, training, and advisory services in fields related to coastal and ocean resources that Texas Sea Grant has led for the period 2014-2017. The work described herein would not have been possible without the support of hundreds of partners, who helped us leverage our federal resources and extend our reach beyond the limits of any single organization. Thanks to our Texas Sea Grant team and partners, we have helped Texans use our coastal and ocean resources in ways that capture the economic, environmental, and cultural benefits these resources offer, while preserving their quality and abundance for future generations.

 

Coastal & Ocean Science at Work for Texans: 2019 Texas Sea Grant Research Symposium Card.

Christine Figgener, Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-312.)

This card advertises the Texas Sea Grant's first Coastal and Ocean Science at Work for Texans Research Symposium where 2014-2017 funded-research and extension work was presented on April 9th 2019. Research focus areas include: Healthy Coastal Ecosystems, Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture, Resilient Communities and Economies, and Environmental Literacy and Workforce Development.

 

Serving the Texas Coast Map.

Sara Carney, Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-313.)

This map of the Texas Coast displays all of the counties that Texas Sea Grant extension works with and where all of the Texas Sea Grant offices are located.

 

2014-2017 Strategic Plan Program Outcomes Analysis.

Heather Wade, Drew Casey, Sara Carney, Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-314.)

This exercise was pioneered by the reporting team at Texas Sea Grant to enhance outcomes analysis and improve the strategic planning process. Data shown here represent outcomes achieved within the 80 selected impact and accomplishment statements for the Site Review Team PIER Report. It is a sampling of 248 impacts and accomplishments achieved by Texas Sea Grant.

 
Hazards Handbook Card.

Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-315.)

This card advertises that Homeowner's Handbook to Prepare for Coastal Natural Hazards is now available online as a website, HazardsHandbook.com. Since Hurricane Harvey, Texas Sea Grant staff have distributed over 8,000 copies of the Texas Homeowner’s Handbooks. This handbook was created to help Texans prepare for natural hazards and help them reduce the risks to lives and property. Although it is never possible to eliminate all risk from a natural hazard, homeowners can take action and implement many small and cost-effective steps that could significantly lower their risk and exposure to those hazards.

 

Texas Sea Grant College Program: Science Serving Texans.

Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-316.)

Texas Sea Grant is a unique partnership that unites the resources of the federal government, the State of Texas and universities across the state to create knowledge, tools, products and services that help coastal communities, marine industries and the people of Texas. It is part of a network of 33 university-​based Sea Grant programs in coastal and Great Lakes states and territories. This fact sheet highlights Texas Sea Grant's focus areas and select 2018 impacts.

 

Immerse Yourself in Research: Texas Sea Grant Scholars Program.

Mia Zwolinski. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-317.)

Each academic year, Texas Sea Grant will designate Texas Sea Grant Scholars from among the LAUNCH: Undergraduate Research Scholars selected from Texas A&M University. The goal of the program is to encourage motivated undergraduates to actively participate in research and to give them the opportunity to communicate their findings as principal authors to the university’s scholarly community. This fact sheet highlights the program's metrics since the its initiation in 2013.

 

Texas Sea Grant Grants-In-Aid of Graduate Research.

Mia Zwolinski. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-318.)

The Texas Sea Grant College Program’s Grants-In-Aid of Graduate Research Program aims to promote scientific excellence and achievement by providing small, two-year grants in support of their research to graduate students enrolled at one of three Texas A&M University institutions. The grants provide financial assistance to graduate students currently enrolled in Master’s or Ph.D. programs in the Texas A&M University System. This fact sheet highlights the program's metrics since the its initiation in 2013.

 

Texas Shores (Volume 44, Number 1, Winter/Spring 2018/2019): Conservation effort in TX pays off.

Melissa Gaskill, Damond Benningfield, Eva Frederick, Evelyn Moreno, Emily Moskal, Pamela Plotkin. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-401.)

TEXAS SHORES is published once a year by the Texas Sea Grant College Program to promote awareness and understanding of the Texas marine environment. Texas Sea Grant is made possible through an institutional award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, as well as appropriations​from the Texas Legislature and local governments. The following articles are in this issue: Conservation effort in Texas pays off; Continuing challenges: Despite substantial progress, sea turtle species in Texas and beyond still face significant threats; The 40-year Rescue (The Bi-National Recovery Plan for the Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle); Coastal Icon: Jeff George; Record-breaking cold-stun season sends conservationist​s to the drawing board; Sea turtle destinations: where to see sea turtles.

 

Sustainable Biofloc Systems for Marine Shrimp.

Tzachi Matzliach Samocha. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-402.)

Sustainable Biofloc Systems for Marine Shrimp is a comprehensive guide that describes the biofloc-​dominated aquaculture systems developed over 20 years of research at Texas A&M AgriLife Research Mariculture Laboratory for the nursery and grow-out production of the Pacific White Shrimp, Litopen​aeus vannamei. The book is useful for all stakeholders, with special attention given to entrepreneurs interested in building a pilot biofloc-​dominated system. In addition to the content of its 15 chapters that cover topics on design, operation and economic analysis, the book includes appendices that expand on relevant topics, links to Excel sheets that assist in calculations, and video links that illustrate important operations tasks. It is a how-to-manual of everything you want to know about the design and operation of high-density indoor biofloc shrimp farming.

 

Oil Spill Science: FAQ Dispersants Edition.

2019. (TAMU-SG-19-501.)

This Oil Spill Science series fact sheet is made possible in part by a grant from the Gulf of Mexico Initiative, and in part by the Sea Grant programs of Texas, Louisiana, Florida, and Mississippi-Alabama. This Frequently Asked Questions edition highlights chemical dispersants. Chemical dispersants break oil into smaller droplets, limiting the amount of oil that comes into contact with wildlife and shorelines. Many people question how they work and whether they are safe for people and animals.

 

Never Use Non-Gulf Shrimp as Bait in Texas.

Laura Picariello. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-502.)

If you use imported shrimp as bait, you could be introducing one of several deadly viruses to native shrimp, crab and crayfish populations. Many of these viruses—like the white-spot syndrome virus—can survive the freezing process and do not die when the imported shrimp is packaged. Though not harmful to humans, if a virus is introduced, native shrimp, crab and crayfish populations could quickly die which would have devastating consequences for the entire ecosystem and the Gulf shrimp food industry. This 4 x 9 inch rack card gives information on only using shrimp native to the Gulf of Mexico.

 

El Manual para Preparar las Viviendas para Enfrentar Desastres Naturales Costeros en Texas.

Craig Davis, Cindie Powell, John Jacob, Spencer Rogers, Tracie Sempier, Rhonda Price, Laura Bowie, Heather Wade, Kate de Gennaro, Dennis Hwang, Darren Okimoto, Laura Bowie. July 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-503.)

El Manual para el Propietario de una Vivienda de Texas se desarrolló como proyecto del Equipo de Resiliencia de Comunidades Costeras de la Alianza del Golfo de México (GOMA, por sus siglas en inglés). La GOMA, una asociación de organizaciones federales, estatales y locales, comparte una visión para construir y mantener comunidades saludables y resilientes. Una prioridad clave de la GOMA es la de aumentar la resiliencia de las comunidades costeras ante desastres naturales. Una de las principales características de las comunidades saludables es el fortalecimiento de la resiliencia individual y saber reconocer que es necesario hacer ajustes a la vida cotidiana. Este manual está diseñado para promover la resiliencia individual, creando así una comunidad fortalecida.

 

Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-504.)

Monofilament fishing line is non-biodegradable and lasts about 600 years in the aquatic environment. Even fishing line that is thrown in the garbage can end up in the environment by blowing out of the garbage can or landfill, or by being taken out by birds or animals, so please dispose of your fishing line responsibly. There are Monofilament Recycling and Recovery Program bins located in popular fishing spots up and down the Texas coast. Remember to take the time and recycle your fishing line.

 

Nunca use camerones de carnada en Texas que no sean del golfo.

Laura Picariello. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-505.)

¿Por qué no debo usar camarones importadosde carnada? Si usa camarones importados de carnada, podría introducir vario virus letales a las poblaciones nativas de camarones, cangrejos y cangrejos de río. Muchos de estos—p. ej. el virus del síndrome de la mancha blanca—pueden sobrevivir la congelación y no mueren cuando se empaca el camarón importado. Aunque no causan daño a los humanos, si se introduce un virus, las poblaciones nativas de camarones, cangrejos y cangrejos de río pueden morir rápidamente, con efectos devastadores para el ecosistema entero y la industria de camarones del golfo.

 

Không Bao Giờ Sử Dụng Tôm Không Phải Xuất Xứ Từ Vùng Vịnh Làm Mồi Câu Ở Texas.

Laura Picariello. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-506.)

Tại sao tôi không nên dùng tôm nhập khẩu làm mồi câu? Nếu bạn sử dụng tôm nhập khẩu làm mồi câu, bạn có thể mang một trong những loài virus nguy hiểm khôn lường đến cho quần thể tôm, cua và tôm hùm đất bản địa. Nhiều trong số những loài virus này—như virus gây hội chứng đốm trắng (white-spot syndrome virus)—có thể sống sót trong quá trình đông lạnh và không chết đi khi tôm nhập khẩu được đóng gói. Mặc dù không gây nguy hiểm cho con người, nhưng nếu một loài virus xuất hiện, quần thể tôm, cua và tôm hùm đất bản địa có thể nhanh chóng chết đi, điều này sẽ gây ra hậu quả hủy hoại đối với toàn thể hệ sinh thái và ngành công nghiệp tôm vùng Vịnh.

 

Smart Seafoodie Pledge.

Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-507.)

Take the #SmartSeafoodie Pledge! As a consumer, your decisions have a big impact. By purchasing local, sustainable seafood, you support families and communities along the Gulf Coast which continue a way of life that goes back generations.

 

Sea Grant and Synthesis: How we can help.

Tara Skelton, Chris Hale, Emily Maung-Douglass, Missy Partyka, Steve Sempier, Monica Wilson. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-508.)

Sea Grant’s oil spill science outreach team has a proven track record of bringing peer-reviewed findings to our network of target audiences in the Gulf of Mexico and beyond. Team specialists are ready to assist GoMRI synthesis activities in the following manner: By asking audience questions in the synthesis process and bringing answers to our network.

 

Birds of a Feather: Coping with Oil.

Emily Maung-Douglass, Larissa Graham, Christine Hale, Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann, and Monica Wilson. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-509.)

Although birds can travel great distances, they cannot necessarily escape oil exposure from natural oil seeps or oil spills caused by humans. Scientists and natural resource managers are still trying to understand the many ways oil exposure can affect birds.

 

Top 5 Frequently Asked Questions about the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Updated 2019).

Emily Maung-Douglass, Larissa Graham, Christine Hale, Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann, and Monica Wilson. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-510.)

Although birds can travel great distances, they cannot necessarily escape oil exposure from natural oil seeps or oil spills caused by humans. Scientists and natural resource managers are still trying to understand the many ways oil exposure can affect birds.

 

Câu hỏi thường gặp: Phiên bản chất phân tán (Vietnamese translation of Frequently asked questions: Dispersants edition).

Emily Maung-Douglass,Christine Hale, Larissa Graham, Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann, and Monica Wilson. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-511.)

Vietnamese:  Hóa chất phân tán phân tách dầu ra thành những giọt nhỏ hơn, hạn chế lượng dầu tiếp xúc với động vật hoang dã và bờ biển. Nhiều người thắc mắc về phương thức hoạt động của chúng cũng như liệu chúng có an toàn cho người và động vật hay không.
English: Chemical dispersants break oil into smaller droplets, limiting the amount of oil that comes into contact with wildlife and shorelines. Many people question how they work and whether they are safe for people and animals.

 

In the air and on the water: Technology used to investigate oil spills.

Monica Wilson, Christine Hale, Emily Maung-Douglass, Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-512.)

Oil detection and monitoring are important for managing marine resources and minimizing potential environmental impacts. New technologies complement traditional ship, satellite, and mooring-based data collection techniques, allowing scientists to study all aspects of oil spills. Along with underwater vehicles, unmanned surface and aerial vehicles, as well as satellites, are used to study oil spills at and above the ocean’s surface. These technologies allow scientists and responders to understand how oil moves on the ocean’s surface. Some have advanced into operational use by the spill response community and others are being tested as response tools.

CÓ AN TOÀN KHÔNG? KIỂM TRA NGUY CƠ SỨC KHỎE TỪ SỰ CỐ TRÀN DẦU DEEPWATER HORIZON (Vietnamese translation of Is it safe? Examining health risks from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill).

Monica Wilson, Christine Hale, Emily Maung-Douglass, Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-513.)

Vietnamese:  Sự cố tràn dầu Deepwater Horizon năm 2010 khiến nhiều du khách và người dân thắc mắc rằng liệu dầu và các chất phân tán dùng để giúp giữ dầu không loang vào bờ có thể khiến họ mắc bệnh hay không. Các nhà khoa học đã nghiên cứu nguy cơ sức khỏe của các hóa chất còn sót lại từ sự cố tràn dầu.
English: The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill left many tourists and residents questioning if oil and the dispersants used to keep oil from reaching the shore could make them sick. Scientists studied the health risks of lingering chemicals from the spill.
Chương Trình Ứng Phó Khẩn Cấp Liên Bang Cho Sự Cố Tràn Dầu: Đạo Luật Stafford và Đạo Luật Ô Nhiễm Dầu (Vietnamese translation of: Federal emergency response framework for oil spills: Stafford Act and Oil Pollution Act).

Monica Wilson, Christine Hale, Emily Maung-Douglass, Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-514.)

Vietnamese:  Khi xảy ra sự cố tràn dầu trên biển, vị trí, lượng dầu tràn và nguyên nhân của sự cố tràn dầu có thể ảnh hưởng đến công tác hậu cần ứng phó. Nỗ lực ứng phó của liên bang tuân thủ hai luật liên bang – Đạo Luật Stafford 1988 và Đạo Luật Ô Nhiễm Dầu 1990. Mặc dù hai luật này có liên quan đến nhau, phạm vi và mục đích của chúng lại khá khác nhau.

English: When a marine oil spill occurs, the location, amount of oil spilled, and cause of the spill can impact the logistics of the response. Federal response efforts are guided by two federal laws – the Stafford Act of 1988 and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Although these two laws are interrelated, the scope and purposes are quite different.

 

Impacts of Oil on Mangroves.

Monica Wilson, Emily Maung-Douglass, Christine Hale, Melissa Partyka,Stephen Sempier, Tara Skelton, LaDon Swann. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-515.)

Extremely productive and beneficial ecosystems, mangrove forests stabilize coastlines by protecting shorelines from storm surges, currents, waves, and tides. They improve coastal water quality and provide shelter to species of fish, crab, shrimp, and mollusks. However, if mangrove forests are compromised by oil spills, they can no longer shield coastlines, provide habitat, or feed organisms living among their roots and branches.

 

HazardsHandbook.com.

Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-701.)

Since Hurricane Harvey, Texas Sea Grant staff have distributed over 8,000 copies of the Texas Homeowner’s Handbooks. This handbook was created to help Texans prepare for natural hazards and help them reduce the risks to lives and property. Although it is never possible to eliminate all risk from a natural hazard, homeowners can take action and implement many small and cost-effective steps that could significantly lower their risk and exposure to those hazards. This handbook is digitized on this website to be user friendly, have the most up-to-date information, and have video resources.

 

Myth Bust Monday: Hurricane Edition! Episode 4 (Video).

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney, Callie Rainosek. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-705.)

 

Myth Bust Monday: Hurricane Edition! Episode 5 (Video).

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney, Callie Rainosek. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-706.)

 

Myth Bust Monday: Hurricane Edition! Episode 6 (Video).

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney, Callie Rainosek. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-707.)

 

Myth Bust Monday: Hurricane Edition! Episode 7 (Video).

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney, Callie Rainosek. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-708.)

 

What are Microplastics and How Do They Affect Our Health? (Video).

Callie Rainosek, Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-711.)

 

Seafood Month: Take the Smart Seafoodie Pledge! (Video).

Corley-Ann Parker, Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-714.)

 

Myth Bust Monnday: Seafood Edition Episode 1 (Video).

Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-715.)

 

Myth Bust Monnday: Seafood Edition Episode 2 (Video).

Kimber De Salvo, Corley-Ann Parker, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-716.)

 

Myth Bust Monnday: Seafood Edition Episode 3 (Video).

Corley-Ann Parker, Kimber De Salvo, Sara Carney. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-717.)

 

G.U.L.F. Restaurant Partnership (Video).

Sara Carney, Kimber De Salvo. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-718.)

 

Three Essays in Environmental and Resource Economics: Hydraulic Fracturing, Water Use, and Marine Recreational Fishing.

Jesse D. Backstrom. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-903.)

This Grants-In-Aid of Graduate Research PhD dissertation includes three essays in environmental and resource economics. The first two pertain to important topics in relation to the upstream oil and gas industry in the U.S. The third pertains to marine recreational fishing demand in the Gulf of Mexico. 

  

The Midden, February 2019.

Diane Humes, Madeleine K. Barnes, Verva Densmore, Chuck Snyder, Lana Berkowitz, Carolyn Miles, Jennifer Trandell. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL501a.)

Published bimonthly by the Galveston Bay Area Chapter - Texas Master Naturalists. The purpose of The Midden is to inform communicate and educate chapter members and the community.

 

The Midden, April 2019.

Diane Humes, Madeleine K. Barnes, Verva Densmore, Chuck Snyder, Lana Berkowitz, Carolyn Miles, Jennifer Trandell. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL501b.)

Published bimonthly by the Galveston Bay Area Chapter - Texas Master Naturalists. The purpose of The Midden is to inform communicate and educate chapter members and the community.

 

The Midden, June 2019.

Diane Humes, Madeleine K. Barnes, Verva Densmore, Chuck Snyder, Lana Berkowitz, Carolyn Miles, Jennifer Trandell. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL501c.)

Published bimonthly by the Galveston Bay Area Chapter - Texas Master Naturalists. The purpose of The Midden is to inform communicate and educate chapter members and the community.

 

The Midden, August 2019.

Diane Humes, Madeleine K. Barnes, Verva Densmore, Chuck Snyder, Lana Berkowitz, Carolyn Miles, Jennifer Trandell. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL501d.)

Published bimonthly by the Galveston Bay Area Chapter - Texas Master Naturalists. The purpose of The Midden is to inform communicate and educate chapter members and the community.

 

The Midden, October 2019.

Diane Humes, Madeleine K. Barnes, Verva Densmore, Chuck Snyder, Lana Berkowitz, Carolyn Miles, Jennifer Trandell. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL501e.)

Published bimonthly by the Galveston Bay Area Chapter - Texas Master Naturalists. The purpose of The Midden is to inform communicate and educate chapter members and the community.

 

The Midden, December 2019.

Lana Berkowitz, Diane Humes, Maureen Nolan-Wilde, Verva Densmore, Julie Massey, Madeline K. Barnes, Susette Mahaffey, Patty Trimingham. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL501f.)

Published bimonthly by the Galveston Bay Area Chapter - Texas Master Naturalists. The purpose of The Midden is to inform communicate and educate chapter members and the community.

 

Coastal and Marine Resources Newsletter (Summer 2019): Jefferson/Chamb​ers Counties.

Nikki Fitzgerald. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL503a.)

This newsletter is published by the Jefferson and Chambers Agrilife Extension offices highlighting the local news and extension updates regarding coastal and marine resources. This newsletter is to inform, communicate, and educate the local community.

 

Coastal and Marine Resources Newsletter (Winter 2019): Jefferson/Chamb​ers Counties.

Nikki Fitzgerald. 2019. (TAMU-SG-19-NL503b.)

This newsletter is published by the Jefferson and Chambers Agrilife Extension offices highlighting the local news and extension updates regarding coastal and marine resources. This newsletter is to inform, communicate, and educate the local community.